Atamate Blog

David Miles - Recent Posts

Dr David Miles is a virologist with 10 years of postdoctoral research in infectious disease immunology and co authorship of over 20 academic papers. Currently a tutor on the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in infectious diseases.

Passive cooling for low-energy buildings.

Passive cooling methods keep the temperature inside a building comfortable without using energy-hungry air-conditioning, fans or heat pumps. Cooling is needed during the summer, when air temperatures get uncomfortably high, but also at cooler times because electronic devices and simple human metabolism can make a...

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Passive cooling for low-energy buildings.

LOT 20 standards for space heaters explained.

Topic: UK building regulations, heating

Standards for space heaters are governed by several European Union standards that remain in place in Britain including Regulation 2015/1188, often called Lot 20, which sets minimum standards for energy efficiency and emissions that all heaters powered by electricity, gas or oil must meet.

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LOT 20 standards for space heaters explained.

The top 5 reasons for facilities managers to consider air quality.

Topic: ventilation, Management, Wellbeing, Indoor environment, Facilities management

Air quality is impacted by carbon dioxide, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides and humidity. Good air quality management has many benefits:

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The top 5 reasons for facilities managers to consider air quality.

MVHR - is it always the best option for domestic buildings?

Mechanical ventilation with heat recovery (MVHR) extracts heat energy from exhaust air. However, it carries a high capital cost and case studies revealed that many systems are incorrectly designed and operated. In the mild climate of most of the British Isles, more efficient options are available at lower cost.

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MVHR - is it always the best option for domestic buildings?

Monitoring the indoor environment: wearables vs fixed sensors.

Topic: Building behaviour, health, Management, TM40, Wellbeing, Indoor environment

Recommendations for promoting workplace health and wellbeing often include monitoring the indoor environment using wearable sensors. Our view is that a fixed sensor network is a better option as it records more parameters, does not depend on who is wearing what sensor and is less intrusive.

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Monitoring the indoor environment: wearables vs fixed sensors.

Viruses indoors 5: The winter vomiting bug.

Topic: health, Office, TM40, Wellbeing, Indoor environment

The winter vomiting bug is caused by the norovirus which spreads rapidly through aerosols and surfaces, survives for days or weeks between human hosts and is resistant to ammonia and alcohol-based cleaning products. We suggest that ultraviolet could be used to control its spread, especially public toilets and...

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Viruses indoors 5: The winter vomiting bug.

Atamate teaches smart buildings to be smarter.

Topic: smart home, Machine learning

Yongchao Huang's recent paper describes Atamate's latest progress in machine learning for the smart home. A set of calculations allows a smart building to quantify the influences of various ambient conditions on the temperature of a room and use them to control a radiator.

 

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Atamate teaches smart buildings to be smarter.

Atamate shows where SAP gets smart controls wrong.

Topic: ventilation, Building behaviour, smart home, UK building regulations, eco controls, Energy, Cooling

Kat Kelly recently showed that rented flats using variable ventilation and direct electrical heating under Atamate smart control delivered better energy efficiency than predicted for heat pump-based systems. We argue that the data shows that automation has been under-valued in planned reforms to the UK building...

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Atamate shows where SAP gets smart controls wrong.

Viruses indoors 4: The flu season.

Topic: COVID-19

The 200 common cold viruses are more prevalent in the British winter. That's mainly because indoor relative humidity drops below the comfort threshold of 40%, making it easier for them to infect. Being infected with one makes us more vulnerable to others, enhancing the misery of the winter 'flu season'.

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Viruses indoors 4: The flu season.

Viruses indoors 2: Licht und Luft.

Topic: health, TM40, Wellbeing, COVID-19, Indoor environment

Modernist architecture in the early 20th century adopted the Licht und Luft principle, maximising light and ventilation to combat tuberculosis. Amid another airborne disease pandemic, the same principles apply: the ultraviolet component of sunlight kills viruses and good ventilation is an established approach to...

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Viruses indoors 2: Licht und Luft.